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42 results for "bassmaster"

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  1. Stickbait gear

    Bassmaster University Staff

    Stickbait tackle The standard for stickbaiting is a 6-foot medium-action baitcasting rod with 12- to 14-pound-test line. Some pros use a 6-foot, 3-inch medium-heavy baitcaster, which permits longer casts. Such tackle is particularly useful when fish...

    Story | Conversation | December 16, 2005
  2. Hooks and sinkers for plastics

    Bassmaster University Staff

    It's important to both balance the hook and sinker to the worm as well as use the right weight for the situation at hand. Here are some tips: A 1/3-ounce sinker is most commonly used for worming. The denser the cover you're fishing, the heavier ...

    Story | Conversation | December 16, 2005
  3. Spinnerbait skirts

    Bassmaster University Staff

    Today, lifelike synthetic materials have largely replaced living rubber in spinnerbait skirts. These skirts "breath" and "pulse" in a lifelike manner and are available in a wider array of colors than rubber skirts. More tips: Use a bright-colored ...

    Story | Conversation | December 16, 2005
  4. Stickbait 101

    Bassmaster University Staff

    These are cigar-shaped topwater lures whose action is largely determined by the angler's expertise in working the rod. They are considered to be the most difficult of all topwater lures to master, and are strong favorites of BASS pros. The preferred ...

    Story | Conversation | December 16, 2005
  5. Pitching tips

    Bassmaster University Staff

    Try these tips for successful pitching. With practice and a properly adjusted reel, it's possible to speed up the pitching procedure by not grasping the lure in your hand. Merely dropping the rod tip can put the lure back in motion. Because pitch...

    Story | Conversation | December 16, 2005
  6. Styling and profiling with worms

    Bassmaster University Staff

    Plastic worms comes in various styles. Here's when to use each: Worms with twist or ribbon tails are primarily used when Texas- and Carolina-rigging. These are highly effective in submerged vegetation, murky water and anytime bass need an extra vis...

    Story | Conversation | December 16, 2005
  7. Spinnerbait retrieves

    Bassmaster University Staff

    The spinnerbait is among the most versatile of all bass lures and may be fished in virtually all fishing conditions by varying the lure weight/style and retrieve. Here are the retrieves most often used by BASS pros: Twilight zone retrieve — The...

    Story | Conversation | December 16, 2005
  8. Pitching gear

    Bassmaster University Staff

    Here are the basics for what you need for success with the pitching technique. Pitching tackle Use a collapsible pitching rod, which is usually from 6 feet, 6 inches long to 6 feet 8 inches long, and the same reel you'd use for flipping. However, b...

    Story | Conversation | December 16, 2005
  9. Weighted jerkbait retrieves

    Bassmaster University Staff

    More than most lures, weighted jerkbaits demand the right "cadence" (retrieve timing) to draw strikes. This is because they're being used to tempt sluggish bass in cold water. Here are some retrieves to try: Sinking retrieve (extremely cold water): ...

    Story | Conversation | December 16, 2005
  10. Poppers

    Bassmaster University Staff

    These lures rejuvenated topwater fishing on the tournament trail for well-known pros like Zell Rowland. Their loud spitting and gurgling produces a reaction strike from bass. Poppers work best on active, keeper-sized bass. When to fish poppers Pros...

    Story | Conversation | December 16, 2005
  11. Shad kills

    Bassmaster University Staff

    It is not the most comfortable time to go bass fishing, but winter is one of the best times to fish rocky lakes. The reason? Shad kills. As the water dips into the low 40s, look for disabled shad flipping weakly a few feet beneath the surface. A susp...

    Story | Conversation | December 16, 2005
  12. The color of worms

    Bassmaster University Staff

    You don't need every worm color under the sun to catch bass under most conditions. Here are some guidelines: For years, the most popular worm colors were purple, blue and black. These colors still work and should be included in any worm selection. ...

    Story | Conversation | December 14, 2005
  13. Weighted jerkbait retrieves

    Bassmaster University Staff

    More than most lures, weighted jerkbaits demand the right "cadence" (retrieve timing) to draw strikes. This is because they're being used to tempt sluggish bass in cold water. Here are some retrieves to try: Sinking Retrieve (extremely cold water): ...

    Story | Conversation | December 14, 2005
  14. Jerkbait size and color

    Bassmaster University Staff

    These lures usually come in 4 1/2-inch and 6-inch sizes. In clear, cold water, most pros use the smaller lures. Try the larger sizes in lakes where bass run big, and where water visibility is at the low end of the preferred range. Because they're be...

    Story | Conversation | December 14, 2005
  15. Scents and rattles

    Bassmaster University Staff

    Many pro anglers use lure scents with worms, or scent-impregnated worms, believing these may trigger finicky bass to bite and hang on longer. Experiment with these products to determine their utility to your personal fishing style. Liquid scent addit...

    Story | Conversation | December 14, 2005
  16. Bass behavior

    Bassmaster University Staff

    Colors, water pH, scent, oxygen and water temperature are all variables pros keep in mind when weighing where and how to fish. A basic understanding of these topics will help you catch more bass. Color Scientists believe that under good light cond...

    Story | Conversation | November 21, 2005