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13 results for "mark fainaru wada"

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  1. Major League Baseball and San Francisco Giants stay away from ste...

    Mark Fainaru-Wada

    Major League Baseball, Giants staying away from steroids issue and Bonds trial.

    Story | Conversation | April 01, 2011
  2. Barry Bonds pleads not guilty again to perjury charges

    Mark Fainaru-Wada

    Barry Bonds has for the fourth time pleaded not guilty to charges he lied to a grand jury when he denied knowingly taking steroids.

    Story | Conversation | March 01, 2011
  3. Survey: Black, white fans see sports as racially progressive

    Mark Fainaru-Wada

    Twenty five years after Martin Luther King Jr.'s life was first honored with a national holiday, black and white sports fans alike view the sports world as far more racially progressive and unifying than the rest of society.

    Story | Conversation | January 09, 2011
  4. Suspended Philadelphia Phillies reliever J.C. Romero sues supplem...

    Mark Fainaru-Wada

    Suspended Phillies reliever J.C. Romero has filed suit against a nutritional supplement manufacturer alleging an unlisted ingredient in one of its products caused him to test positive for a substance banned by Major League Baseball.

    Story | Conversation | April 27, 2009
  5. Start of Barry Bonds' perjury trial faces lengthy postponement

    Mark Fainaru-Wada

    The government announced Friday its intention to appeal pretrial rulings that would keep out significant pieces of evidence, bringing Barry Bonds' perjury trial to a screeching halt.

    Story | Conversation | February 27, 2009
  6. Several witnesses expected to say Barry Bond used steroids

    Mark Fainaru-Wada

    Several witnesses are expected to testify at Barry Bonds' perjury trial that they witnessed the seven-time MVP inject himself with performance-enhancing drugs, according to a government filing Friday.

    Story | Conversation | February 13, 2009
  7. Unforeseen series of events lead to A-Rod's positive test coming ...

    Mark Fainaru-Wada

    The story that Alex Rodriguez tested positive for steroids in 2003, as reported Saturday by Sports Illustrated, likely wouldn't have come to light had the BALCO scandal not erupted that fall.

    Story | Conversation | February 07, 2009
  8. OTL: Judge seems ready to score one for Barry Bonds

    Mark Fainaru-Wada

    Barry Bonds appears headed for a victory in court, as a judge appears intent on dismissing some government evidence.

    Story | Conversation | February 05, 2009
  9. Judge throws out three counts in Barry Bonds' perjury case

    Mark Fainaru-Wada

    As the Barry Bonds perjury case continues to move toward a March jury trial, the judge on Monday dismissed three of the 15 counts but left intact the bulk of the government's charges against the former Giants slugger.

    Story | Conversation | November 24, 2008
  10. Committee memo specifies Clemens' 'implausible' testimony

    Mark Fainaru-Wada

    Want to know exactly why Congress wants the Justice Department to investigate Roger Clemens for perjury? It's all spelled out in an 18-page memo made public on Wednesday, writes Mark Fainaru-Wada.

    Story | Conversation | February 27, 2008
  11. Transcripts: McNamee tried to balance Clemens loyalty, pressure f...

    Mark Fainaru-Wada

    Transcripts released after the congressional hearing on steroids in baseball provide new insights into the contentious saga between pitcher Roger Clemens and his former trainer, Brian McNamee, writes Mark Fainaru-Wada.

    Story | Conversation | February 14, 2008
  12. Mitchell report sheds light on what Giants knew about Bonds

    Mark Fainaru-Wada

    ESPN investigative reporter Mark Fainaru-Wada examines what Sen. George Mitchell's report on steroids in baseball has to say about BALCO, Barry Bonds and what the San Francisco Giants knew and when they knew it.

    Story | Conversation | December 13, 2007
  13. As Bonds enters plea, he also enters whole new world

    Mark Fainaru-Wada

    Once entirely in control of his surroundings, Barry Bonds is now anything but in charge. What lies ahead for baseball's home run king is a string of court dates and legal motions, perhaps leading to a trial, writes ESPN's Mark Fainaru-Wada.

    Story | Conversation | December 07, 2007