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9 results for "rob neyer"

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  1. The next great baseball movie?

    David Schoenfield

    Fun piece from Rob Neyer at SB Nation on what the next great baseball movie might be, following the success of "42." He asks different people for their ideas -- Bob Costas says Barry Bonds (good luck finding an audience for that one), Allen Barra sug...

    Blog | April 24, 2013
  2. Sizing up the good ... and the bad

    Rob Neyer

    While the Angels, among others, have made significant additions, the White Sox are among clubs to have lost talent.

    Story | Conversation | March 05, 2004
  3. Predicting the standings pure folly

    Rob Neyer

    Predicting how teams will finish in the standings not just in 2004, but for the next five years is totally absurd.

    Story | Conversation | February 11, 2004
  4. Winning 'Championships' the Ultimate

    Rob Neyer

    The Ultimate Standings say a lot about what fans want. But, in reality, winning is what's ultimately most important.

    Story | Conversation | February 04, 2004
  5. Quality of competition basically unimportant

    Rob Neyer

    How players perform with respect to their quality of competition doesn't seem to be that important after all.

    Story | Conversation | January 16, 2004
  6. Angels back in the saddle

    Rob Neyer

    Will Vladimir Guerrero put the Angels back on top? Playing in baseball's toughest division is no guarantee.

    Story | Conversation | January 11, 2004
  7. Is quality of competition important?

    Rob Neyer

    How players perform with respect to their quality of competition seems to be an effective way of evaluation.

    Story | Conversation | January 09, 2004
  8. M's fortunate to not have Vizquel

    Rob Neyer

    It's for the Mariners' best that their attempt of acquiring Omar Vizquel fell through.

    Story | Conversation | December 17, 2003
  9. Teams have most success in 'hits prevented'

    Rob Neyer

    There is new evidence that teams, not individuals, historically have the most success on batting average on balls in play.

    Story | Conversation | July 03, 2002