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5 results for "style"

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  1. Required reading for retriever trainers

    Mike Stewart

    We receive many inquiries for training resource recommendations. There are many books and training videos on the market so many philosophies, so many different training methods. I always recommend selecting the training philosophy which best suits your style and one which will most likely produce the type dog you want in the future. Then, stick with it. Jumping around among various training resources often confuses the trainer. You can only imagine what it will do for their poor dog. The books I have recommended are all in alignment with the Wildrose way... the British way of training retrievers.

    Story | Conversation | February 27, 2004
  2. Puttin' on the polish

    Mike Stewart

    The development of the polished retriever is largely a factor of time invested in a dog of normal or above normal aptitude. Polish arises from an attention to details. Details promote quality, and quality exceeds expectations. Polish is more than style. It is a dog's functional behaviors, skills and responses that contribute to a satisfactory day in the field.

    Story | Conversation | September 10, 2003
  3. Delivery to hand, part III

    Mike Stewart

    A desirable attribute of a good waterfowl retriever is the smooth delivery to hand of downed game which is neither mangled, crushed or partially plucked by our canine hunting pal. Both style and function dictate that retrievers not incessantly drop bumpers or birds on the return. A gundog with a sloppy mouth attempting to deal with a lightly pricked drake mallard or pheasant will interrupt the hunt with an unnecessary frolick possibly culminating in a lost bird. Developing a dog that consistently delivers to hand is largely a matter of conditioning

    Story | Conversation | August 19, 2003
  4. Delivery to hand, part II

    Mike Stewart

    A desirable attribute of a good waterfowl retriever is the smooth delivery to hand of downed game which is neither mangled, crushed or partially plucked by our canine hunting pal. Both style and function dictate that retrievers not incessantly drop bumpers or birds on the return. A gundog with a sloppy mouth attempting to deal with a lightly pricked drake mallard or pheasant will interrupt the hunt with an unnecessary frolick possibly culminating in a lost bird. Developing a dog that consistently delivers to hand is largely a matter of conditioning

    Story | Conversation | August 19, 2003
  5. Delivery to hand, part I

    Mike Stewart

    A desirable attribute of a good waterfowl retriever is the smooth delivery to hand of downed game which is neither mangled, crushed or partially plucked by our canine hunting pal. Both style and function dictate that retrievers not incessantly drop bumpers or birds on the return. A gundog with a sloppy mouth attempting to deal with a lightly pricked drake mallard or pheasant will interrupt the hunt with an unnecessary frolick possibly culminating in a lost bird. Developing a dog that consistently delivers to hand is largely a matter of conditioning

    Story | Conversation | August 12, 2003